[video] We’ll be uploading our entire MINDS to computers by 2045 and our bodies will be replaced by machines within 90 years, Google expert claims

iRobot is on the way according Dir. of Engineering, at Google, Ray Kurzweil.

via Daily Mail UK

In this video Ray Kurzweil discusses his predictions about radical life extension, singularity, life expansion and the imminence of physical immortality. He invites participants to the second international Global Future 2045 congress (June 2013)http://www.GF2045.com.

“If we have radical life extension only, we would get profoundly bored, we’d have profound existential ennui, running out of things to do, and new ideas, but that’s not what’s going to happen. In addition to radical life extension, we’re going to have radical life expansion, we’re going to have millions of virtual environments to explore, we’re going to literally expand our brains.”

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Google Debuts “OK Glass” Eyewear Prototype

The future is here. I can definitely see this being something very popular in a few years for vacations.

Screen Shot 2013-02-20 at 5.02.52 PM

via CNET

The Glass eyewear perches a screen just above a person’s ordinary field of view; the device itself is equipped with a processor, camera, head-tracking orientation sensors, and other electronics drawn from the smartphone industry. Google began selling Glass developer prototypes called Explorer last year for $1,500 that are due to ship this year.
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[pic] Google Street View Helps Capture Seven Heroin Dealers in Brooklyn

Big brother is also the biggest search engine on the planet.

via NY Post

Earth to drug dealers — Google is watching!

Three brazen heroin dealers were captured in Google Street View images working their favorite Brooklyn drug corner, where they peddled their product to hipsters and other dope fiends, law-enforcement sources said yesterday.

Multiple images captured along Jackson Street and Kingsland Avenue by the search engine’s ubiquitous camera car show the trio milling about in front of the Neighborhood Grocery — one of two East Williamsburg bodegas where they set up shop.

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First Look at Google Wave

via AP

SAN FRANCISCO — Google Inc. is hatching a new species of e-mail and instant messaging, but the Internet search leader first wants the hybrid service to evolve even more with the help of independent computer programmers.

The free tool, called “Google Wave,” runs in a Web browser and combines elements of e-mail, instant messaging, wikis and photo sharing in an effort to make online communication more dynamic. Google hopes Wave simplifies the way people collaborate on projects or exchange opinions about specific topics.

Google offered the first glimpse of its latest offering Thursday during the Mountain View, Calif.-based company’s annual conference for software developers who build programs on top of its services. The rest of the Web-surfing public won’t be able to hop on Google Wave until later in the year. (Go to for a preview.) http://wave.google.com

By the time Wave rolls out for everyone, Google hopes independent programmers will have found new ways to use the service.

Among other things, Google is counting on outsiders to figure out how to weave Wave into the popular Internet communications service Twitter, social networks like Facebook and existing Web-based e-mail services, said Lars Rasmussen, a Google engineering manager. Continue reading

An invention that could change the internet for ever

google-logo-2via Independent UK

The biggest internet revolution for a generation will be unveiled this month with the launch of software that will understand questions and give specific, tailored answers in a way that the web has never managed before.

The new system, Wolfram Alpha, showcased at Harvard University in the US last week, takes the first step towards what many consider to be the internet’s Holy Grail – a global store of information that understands and responds to ordinary language in the same way a person does.

Although the system is still new, it has already produced massive interest and excitement among technology pundits and internet watchers.

Computer experts believe the new search engine will be an evolutionary leap in the development of the internet. Nova Spivack, an internet and computer expert, said that Wolfram Alpha could prove just as important as Google. “It is really impressive and significant,” he wrote. “In fact it may be as important for the web (and the world) as Google, but for a different purpose. Continue reading

Is Google About to Buy Twitter?

google-twitter

via Cnet

Google is in “late stage” talks to acquire microblogging service Twitter, according to a report on Thursday on TechCrunch citing two unnamed sources.

All Things Digital’s Kara Swisher, however, on Friday said the report isn’t true, also citing unnamed sources and saying the companies have only been in product-related discussions. And a TechCrunch update backpedaled a bit, citing another source who said acquisition talks were at a “fairly early stage.”

Twitter lets people post short 140-character messages; people often subscribe to follow the stream of these tweets from acquaintances and, increasingly, companies and celebrities. After an unpleasant rocky period in which the company’s servers frequently were crushed under the strain of the service, Twitter has experienced tremendous growth.

Google’s origins, core technology, and profits come from search, but Twitter would fit in neatly with the company’s somewhat lackluster attempt to become more of a social hub too. Facebook, which attempted to acquire Twitter in 2008, is the exemplar of just how rich a medium the Internet can become for social interactions. Social sites, though, have had a hard time showing they can mean revenue and profits as well. Continue reading

Google to Announce Venture Fund

 

google-lego-logo

via NY Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Google, which has invested in many startups over the years, will announce on Tuesday that it is creating a venture capital arm whose main objective will be to turn a profit.

The group, called Google Ventures, is expected to invest up to $100 million over the next 12 months. It will be overseen by David Drummond, who will continue in his role as senior vice president of corporate developing and chief legal officer at Google. Investments will be vetted by William Maris, who joined Google about a year ago, and Rich Miner, a co-founder of Android, a mobile software startup that Google acquired in 2005.

Mr. Maris said in an interview that Google will tap the connections of its employees and its ties to the venture capital world to find promising startups in areas like the Internet, clean technology and life sciences.

Many other companies have set up venture capital units. But those groups typically have dual missions of profiting from investments and advancing their parent company’s strategic goals, and their track record has been mixed. Continue reading

Google turns voicemail into email

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via Reuters

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Google Inc is seeking to blur the line between the telephone and the computer even further with the introduction of Google Voice on Thursday.

The new service weaves traditional phone features with Google’s Gmail email product, allowing a person to store transcripts of voicemail phone messages in their email inbox and to find a specific nugget of information within a phone message as if trawling through a sea of emails.

The move comes as Google increasingly branches out from its stronghold in Internet search, as it seeks to carve out a role in everything from cell phones to personal productivity software.

And it demonstrates the company’s ability to fuse various technologies — home-grown and acquired — into new products, even as the economic recession puts the future of certain Google projects in question.

Google Voice is based on the technology of Grand Central Communications, a company that Google acquired in July 2007. After Grand Central remained silent for nearly two years under the Google flag, some observers wondered whether it had met the same fate as Dodgeball, a Google acquisition that was formally shut down this year.

Google Voice represents the first major update to Grand Central since the acquisition. Like the original Grand Central product, Google Voice offers consumers a single phone number that can route incoming calls to home, office and cell phones.

The new version uses speech-recognition technology that Google developed for its Goog-411 telephone directory service, automatically transcribing voicemails into text. The transcribed messages can be forwarded as an email or SMS text message to a person’s email inbox. Continue reading

YouTube blocks UK users from watching music videos

you-tube-logo

via MyWay

LONDON (AP) – Google Inc. (GOOG) (GOOG) said Monday it will block U.K. users from watching music videos on its popular video-sharing site YouTube after negotiations with Britain’s music royalty-collecting body broke down.

Google said it would begin blocking British users starting Monday night. The Internet titan said it knew the move would cause “significant disappointment.”

But it said its hand was forced by PRS for Music, which it said is asking for royalties that would cause Google to lose money every time a video was played on YouTube.

“Our previous license from PRS for Music has expired, and we’ve been unable so far to come to an agreement to renew it on terms that are economically sustainable for us,” Google said in a statement. Until a solution is found, it added, “we will be blocking premium music videos in the UK that have been supplied or claimed by record labels.” Continue reading

Google apologizes for Gmail outage

gmail-logo-readerszone

Um, they haven’t fixed this sh*t yet, still suffering an outage

via CNet

Business and personal users of Gmail suffered an outage starting about 1:30 a.m. PST Tuesday, but Google said it’s fixed the problem.

“If you’ve tried to access your Gmail account today, you are probably aware by now that we’re having some problems. Shortly after 10 9:30am GMT our monitoring systems alerted us that Gmail consumer and businesses accounts worldwide could not get access to their email,” said Acacio Cruz, Google’s Gmail site reliability manager, in a blog posting Tuesday. “We’re working very hard to solve the problem and we’re really sorry for the inconvenience.”

“The problem is now resolved and users have had access restored,” Google said on its Gmail status page. “Many” users were affected, Google said.

Google promises that customers paying for the Google Apps service will have access to Gmail at least 99.9 percent of the time each month or Google has to pay a penalty. So far Google hasn’t dipped below that, the company said last year. Continue reading

BREAKING: Google deleting music blogger posts

googlehellevil

via Inquisitr

There is a nervous chill going through the music industry bloggers corner of the larger blogosphere and it has to do with posts of theirs just disappearing. Literally one minute they are there and the next minute they are gone. LA Weekly is reporting on the story that the bloggers that are being affected are all using Google’s Blogger platform which needless to say has a lot of music bloggers looking for new homes.

The story first came to the forefront when Ryan Spaulding, the writer behind the Boston based music blog Ryan’s Smashing Life, noticed that moth old posts that he had written; as well as much older ones, were disappearing from his site. As far as he could see there was no rhyme or reason to it. Unsure of what was happening he started comparing notes with other music bloggers and as a result found that posts right across the web – everything from posts about Abba to Zappa, had vanished.

It was only after a number of emails and conversations that Ryan and the other bloggers figured out that all the affected blogs where located on Google’s Blogger platform

Eventually, though, a consensus emerged: Each post takedown occurred on a blog hosted by the Google-owned Blogger platform, the publishing system used by the majority of mp3 sites, particularly those founded prior to 2007, when the open-source WordPress software became the vogue. Google, the bloggers believe, has quietly changed the methods by which it enforces its user agreement. Whereas in the past, a blog owner would receive a warning before a post’s removal, Google is now simply hitting the delete button. In Spaulding’s case, this means that posts written over the past year or more on Wilco, the Annuals, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Matisyahu and Earth, Wind & Fire are gone.

“I’d received the label’s press releases and followed their directions, spending my time and energy to promote their albums,” explains a frustrated Spaulding. “By pulling down my post, they destroyed my intellectual creativity, the very same thing they’re erroneously accusing me of doing. Say someone had linked to that post, or [blog aggregator] Hype Machine — it’s gone completely. If I go into my Blogger table of contents, it’s gone. Not de-published — gone.” Continue reading

Attack of the A.I.? Google and Nasa back new school for futurists

googlenasa

via FT

I been telling folks that they about to fire up Skynet, but nobody listens

Google and Nasa are throwing their weight behind a new school for futurists in Silicon Valley to prepare scientists for an era when machines become cleverer than people.

The new institution, known as “Singularity University”, is to be headed by Ray Kurzweil, whose predictions about the exponential pace of technological change have made him a controversial figure in technology circles.

Google and Nasa’s backing demonstrates the growing mainstream acceptance of Mr Kurzweil’s views, which include a claim that before the middle of this century artificial intelligence will outstrip human beings, ushering in a new era of civilisation.

To be housed at Nasa’s Ames Research Center, a stone’s-throw from the Googleplex, the Singularity University will offer courses on biotechnology, nano-technology and artificial intelligence.

The so-called “singularity” is a theorised period of rapid technological progress in the near future. Mr Kurzweil, an American inventor, popularised the term in his 2005 book “The Singularity is Near”.

Proponents say that during the singularity, machines will be able to improve themselves using artificial intelligence and that smarter-than-human computers will solve problems including energy scarcity, climate change and hunger. Continue reading

Offline? Google’s Gmail will still be available

gmail-logo-readerszone

via FoxNews 

SAN FRANCISCO —  Now there’s one less excuse for not dealing with your e-mail.

Google Inc. is giving people a way to manage their e-mail even when they’re offline, marking the Internet search leader’s latest move to unshackle its services from the Web.

The offline feature introduced this week is aimed primarily at workers who rely on Google’s Gmail service as part of their jobs. But anyone with a standard account can choose the option. (This can be accomplished by clicking on “settings” and then entering Google’s “labs” section.)

After the e-mail box synchronizes with a computer’s hard drive, virtually all of Gmail’s usual tools become functional offline _ except for the ability to send and receive messages. Those chores are handled the next time a computer connects to the Internet.

Google is trying to lessen its dependence on Internet advertising by selling an online package of commonly used business programs that include a souped-up version of Gmail. The offline feature makes the e-mail program more competitive with rival Microsoft Corp.’s Exchange and Outlook programs, which are widely used by corporations. Continue reading

Google plans to make PCs history

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via Guardian UK

Google is to launch a service that would enable users to access their personal computer from any internet connection, according to industry reports. But campaigners warn that it would give the online behemoth unprecedented control over individuals’ personal data.

The Google Drive, or “GDrive”, could kill off the desktop computer, which relies on a powerful hard drive. Instead a user’s personal files and operating system could be stored on Google’s own servers and accessed via the internet.

The long-rumoured GDrive is expected to be launched this year, according to the technology news website TG Daily, which described it as “the most anticipated Google product so far”. It is seen as a paradigm shift away from Microsoft’s Windows operating system, which runs inside most of the world’s computers, in favour of “cloud computing”, where the processing and storage is done thousands of miles away in remote data centres.

Home and business users are increasingly turning to web-based services, usually free, ranging from email (such as Hotmail and Gmail) and digital photo storage (such as Flickr and Picasa) to more applications for documents and spreadsheets (such as Google Apps). The loss of a laptop or crash of a hard drive does not jeopardise the data because it is regularly saved in “the cloud” and can be accessed via the web from any machine. Continue reading

Army Using Video Games to Recruit in Malls

via Reuters

PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) – The U.S. Army, struggling to ensure it has enough manpower as it fights wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, is wooing young Americans with video games, Google maps and simulated attacks on enemy positions from an Apache helicopter.

Departing from the recruiting environment of metal tables and uniformed soldiers in a drab military building, the Army has invested $12 million in a facility that looks like a cross between a hotel lobby and a video arcade.

army_war_games

The U.S. Army Experience Center at the Franklin Mills shopping mall in northeast Philadelphia has 60 personal computers loaded with military video games, 19 Xbox 360 video game controllers and a series of interactive screens describing military bases and career options in great detail.

Potential recruits can hang out on couches and listen to rock music that fills the space. Continue reading

Google Tries Converting Every Book into Digital Format

e-book-concept-design-a

via NY Times

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — Ben Zimmer, executive producer of a Web site and software package called the Visual Thesaurus, was seeking the earliest use of the phrase “you’re not the boss of me.” Using a newspaper database, he had found a reference from 1953.

But while using Google’s book search recently, he found the phrase in a short story contained in “The Church,” a periodical published in 1883 and scanned from the Bodleian Library at Oxford.

Ever since Google began scanning printed books four years ago, scholars and others with specialized interests have been able to tap a trove of information that had been locked away on the dusty shelves of libraries and in antiquarian bookstores.

According to Dan Clancy, the engineering director for Google book search, every month users view at least 10 pages of more than half of the one million out-of-copyright books that Google has scanned into its servers. Continue reading

Report: Warner Music Unplugs From YouTube

warner_bros_logo

via The Street

Warner Music Group(WMG QuoteCramer on WMGStock Picks) Saturday ordered YouTube to remove all music videos by Warner artists, according to a published media report.

Warner Music’s demand comes after it was unable to work out a new licensing agreement with YouTube, according to the report, published Saturday by Reuters. YouTube is owned by Google(GOOG QuoteCramer on GOOGStock Picks).

Negotiations between the companies fell apart because Warner Music wants a bigger portion of the potential revenue from YouTube’s online visitor traffic, according to the report.

“We simply cannot accept terms that fail to appropriately and fairly compensate recording artists, songwriters, labels and publishers for the value they provide,” Warner Music was quoted saying in a statement.

In 2006 Warner Music, Universal Music and Sony Music took stakes in YouTube, the report noted. Soon after, Google bought YouTube, and the companies profited from the acquisition. Continue reading

Google to Launch AdSense for Games

via Media Week

Google is making an aggressive play in the online gaming world, as the search giant announced it will expand its AdSense product to various Web-based gaming sites and platforms.

Like Google AdSense for publishers, which allows Web sites and blogs of all sizes to add text links to ads delivered by Google to their pages on a self-serve basis, Google’s AdSense for Games has been designed to enable game publishers large and small to monetize their game by adding video, display and text ads from the company. However, at launch, Google is limiting AdSense for Games to publishers, who produce games that have a minimum level of usage.

Among Google’s initial partners is Mochi Media, a company which provides distribution and analytics tools for a network of small game publishers, many of whom create games that are built to travel across the Internet–anywhere from pure gaming sites to personal blogs. Google’s deal with Mochi will initially focus solely on international ad inventory. Continue reading

Google Goes After the TV with Google Media Server

Google Media Server

Source: TechCrunch

Google just announced its odd Google Media Server, a Windows app that finds photos, music, and video and makes it available to DLNA devices like the PlayStation 3, XBox 360, and most Media Center PCs.

Google Media Server is a Windows application that aims to bridge the gap between Google and your TV. It uses Google Desktop technology such as Desktop gadgets for the administration tool and Google Desktop Search to locate media files. All you need is a PC running Google Desktop and a UPnP-enabled device (e.g. a PlayStation 3). At the touch of a button, you can then:* Access videos, music, and photos stored on your PC* View Picasa Web Albums* Play your favorite YouTube videos
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Google Can’t Figure Out How to Cash in on Youtube Yet

San Francisco (CA) – Google’s CEO says the company still hasn’t figured out how to make money from YouTube. In an interview with The New Yorker, Eric Schmidt said Google hasn’t yet monetized the millions of video views daily from YouTube, but added that the company isn’t in that big of a hurry. “We have the luxury of time,” Schmidt said.

Two years ago, Google paid $1.65 billion for the world’s most popular online video site. According to Schmidt, it was “obvious” that Google could make “significant” amounts of money from YouTube, but so far that hasn’t happened just yet. Google recently added in-video ads that appear briefly along the bottom (like a news broadcast lower-third). Viewers can click on these ads and be taken to another site.

In the same interview, Schmidt denied Google was monopolizing the ad space and gave credit to Yahoo which excels in display-based ads.

You can view the entire video interview at the New Yorker’s site here.

Louis Vuitton Takes Google to Court in France over Copyright

Louie vs Google

via Upscale Swagger/NY Times

Europe’s highest court will hear a trademark infringement suit concerning Google‘s keyword advertising system, a case that ventures into an untested area of law that could impact the company’s lucrative ad revenue.

Fashion retailer Louis Vuitton won a lawsuit in France over Google’s AdWords system, where advertisers bid for keywords. The keywords are used to place ads related to a person’s search terms using Google’s search engine or in Web pages with similar content.

AdWords suggests variations of certain keywords to advertisers when they are using the company’s interface. Louis Vuitton said the search engine offers terms such as “Louis Vuitton fakes” and “Louis Vuitton replicas,” according to Pinsent Masons, which runs the Out-law.com legal blog.

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