Study Says Vegans and Vegetarians Have Low Sperm Count

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As the debate rages on between meat eaters and the vegan community as to what diet is the most optimal for health, new information has been released about the how these diets affect sperm count. This study also examines the effect of coffee, alcohol, and vegetables on sperm production for those wanting to produce children. Read more below: via Daily Beast

The paper’s authors also believe that the soy-rich diet of non-meat eaters could be to blame due to its levels of phyto-estrogens, which have similar properties to estrogen itself (and could therefore be overpowering a man’s testosterone). “It’s hard to tell people not to be vegetarians if they are trying to conceive,” said Eliza Orzylowska, an obstetrician at Loma Linda University Medical Center. “But I would caution against using soy, at least for 74 days beforehand, which is the time it takes for sperm to be replaced.”

 

It seems a week doesn’t go by without a new study touting a discovery about sperm count. What’s true and what’s myth?
It’s the news every beer-chugging, steak-chomping, broccoli-burning man has waiting for: Vegetables are bad for your health.

Screen Shot 2014-10-25 at 9.43.50 AM   A new study presented at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine’s (ASRM) annual meeting      revealed that hopeful fathers-to-be who consumed large amounts of fresh produce had a significantly  reduced sperm count, meaning that less carrots and more calzones could be the answer to your baby-  making woes.

The fertility research was carried out over four years across communities in Southern California with a high  population of Seventh-Day Adventists, whose strict diet excludes meat. Their average life span—which, at  89, is approximately 10 years longer than the average American—was thought to be linked to the quality of  their sperm, but the research found the reverse. Only a third of sperm in vegetarians or vegans was found to  be active, while this number was almost double among carnivorous types, who had a sperm count of 70  million per ml. Compare this with the little swimmers of vegetarians, who clocked in at 50 million per ml, and it looks as though protein consumption has a significant effect on male fertility.

The paper’s authors also believe that the soy-rich diet of non-meat eaters could be to blame due to its levels of phyto-estrogens, which have similar properties to estrogen itself (and could therefore be overpowering a man’s testosterone). “It’s hard to tell people not to be vegetarians if they are trying to conceive,” said Eliza Orzylowska, an obstetrician at Loma Linda University Medical Center. “But I would caution against using soy, at least for 74 days beforehand, which is the time it takes for sperm to be replaced.”

So does this research mean meat-refusing males should start ditching their diets? “I’m not worrying [about these studies] much,” confesses Jon Robinson, a 23-year-old vegetarian medical student. “That said, I am always very edgy about ‘engineered’ products like soy-derivatives. They just don’t seem natural.”

Though the initial findings in this study do point toward some potentially interesting developments, the forever-conflicting advice over how to nurture healthy swimmers is endless. Is this latest discovery just another spurious claim to sperm fame?

FULL STORY HERE….

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