An Open Letter to ‘White Supremacy’: Sincerely, A White Male

With the political and social climate in the U.S. being where it is today, I thought now would be an appropriate time to offer an alternative perspective on the concept of “White Supremacy”. This is a term that we hear thrown around a lot to describe the repressive power structure – if you will – that penetrates every facet of society in this country and abroad, and the reactionary behavioral symptoms of said system that are prevalent in much of the White demographic. That is an extremely condensed breakdown, but, hopefully, you get the gist. Now, let’s take a look at the textbook definition of “White supremacy”:

“the belief, theory, or doctrine that white people are inherently superior to people from all other racial groups, especially black people, and are therefore rightfully the dominant group in any society.” (SOURCE)

Let’s examine this more closely. Number one, are we using the term in an objective or subjective context? If one isn’t objectively superior, then are they REALLY “superior” at all (especially if the knowledge that provided them the means to accomplish, well, everything, came from the minds of people of color)? If not, should the name “White supremacy” be dignified with being the official title for this disease plaguing the world? To me, if one was “superior” or “supreme” in nature, it would be self-evident; likewise, it would be self-evident that others are “inferior.” Historically, has that been the case with us (Europeans) and Africans, Asians, etc.? Absolutely not. We are talking about an ideology that had to literally be imposed on and forced into the minds of the people, whether covertly or overtly, through a process that began in 1492 and into today. Late 15th-16th century European war propaganda did whatever it took to paint their enemies in a negative light to justify their reprehensible and rapacious deeds and motives, and we often overlook the contradiction in those accusations, many of which were going on right there in Europe and even the American colonies. We see those same propaganda tactics used in the mainstream media today against people of color. But, is cannibalism a trait of a “civilized” people or society? Have we forgotten that it was the Moors’ “superior mathematical knowledge and sailing technologies” that “resulted in a Portuguese fleet capable of negotiating the high Atlantic seas?” (SOURCE). Have we forgotten about Timbuktu? Take a look at Herodotus’ description of the Labyrinth at Heliopolis, in Ancient Egypt. Yes, that remarkable architectural feat from the Ancient World came from the minds and hands of BLACK PEOPLE.

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If ones TRULY felt superior, why would they have bombed Black Wall Street, a community that practiced Black economics and self-empowerment? Why would the Black Panther Party have been “the biggest threat to America’s national security” for, really, no reason at all? Would the CIA, FBI, and police have been so adamant about destabilizing and thwarting the growth and success of Black movements? If they were “inferior,” they would’ve inevitably failed anyways, right? Declassified government emails show that one of the factors in France’s commitment to attack Libya was to stop Gaddafi’s aspiration for a gold-backed African currency. Speaking of Gaddafi, would so many Black leaders over the years been assassinated or died under suspicious circumstances? How about the fact that Africa and many other “3rd World” countries are ground zero for chemical warfare? And, let’s not forget about the Tuskegee Experiment. Are these all indicators of a “superior” people? No. You know what that really is? FEAR. The FEAR of a BLACK NATION’s return to power.

You wouldn’t need to, nor allow someone to whitewash history. One would think the “superiority” of their own would be enough. You wouldn’t take the great Black civilization called Egypt and make it White. Everyone in the biblical histories wouldn’t be a damn European when that is not only impossible, but the biblical text doesn’t even support that. You wouldn’t keep showing Africans as “primitive” and “savages” and “slaves” in that Western region of Africa when that region alone has been home to NUMEROUS great kingdoms and empires, such as, Mali, Ghana, Dahomey (take a look at Benin’s bronze work below), etc. We can’t act like we don’t see the tremendous influence Black minds and ideas have over the entire world, and have had as long as man has walked this Earth. Yet, it seems the extent of Black History that makes it into these public school curriculums or on the big screen only goes as far back as slavery.

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Working Title/Artist: Plaque: Warrior and AttendantsDepartment: AAOACulture/Period/Location: HB/TOA Date Code: 08Working Date: 16th-17th century photography by mma, Digital File DT1231.tif retouched by film and media (jnc) 9_24_10

White people/European-Americans, if anything you’ve read here struck a nerve, then you are more than likely part of the problem. It doesn’t matter if one is an integrationist, separatist, nationalist, whatever…what this boils down to is respect for other’s human rights. Why must some of us withdraw our support and isolate ourselves from movements like Black Lives Matter as soon as we feel like they are “racist” or their choice of expression is “threatening” or makes us feel “uncomfortable.” Threatening and uncomfortable? Name just ONE instance where a Black group, movement, or organization targeted White people. Compare that to the countless instances where Black people have been beaten, killed enslaved by Whites simply based on the color of their skin and how the sight of it made us “feel” when we saw it. So, what REALLY is our problem with these movements? Because it seems whether your are the Black Panthers, the Civil Rights movement, or the Black Lives Matter movement, Black people are constantly met with resistance by many of us in their struggle for equality, justice, and empowerment.

We need to be more proactive in trying to gain an understanding of movements like Black Lives Matter and the circumstances and conditions that sparked it. It is the lack of understanding due to the contrast between the White and Black experiences in the U.S. that causes such division and opposition when Black people take to the streets or internet to let their voices be heard. Besides, most if not all Black movements in U.S. history were not anti-White. We also need to stop these reactionary, defensive, and, often, antagonistic tactics like the “All Lives Matter,” “White Lives Matter,” and “Blue Lives Matter” campaigns that do nothing but trivialize and take away from genuine movements with genuine causes like Black Lives Matter. Seriously. It is time for those of us Whites who proclaim we are not racist to prove it. We must be just as outspoken when one of our own makes discriminatory, prejudicial, and racist remarks in our presence or else we are racist sympathizers and thus no better than a racist, and should be held to the same level of accountability for passively allowing this B.S. to perpetuate. On another note, what right do we have to debate U.S. immigration laws and speak ill of the Latinos coming over here when it was European foreigners who conceived and ratified the damn “Naturalization Act?” Who gave us that authority?

In closing, one may choose to use whatever term to describe this system that they like. I just encourage all of you who read this to consider whether or not using “their” designated term for such a weak and pathetic mental illness that wrongfully places one race at the top and all others at the bottom is really the most ideal and accurate. It is through my experiences and what I’ve learned in my 22 years of life that I’ve reached this understanding. We should strive, through the close study of history, to properly diagnose this cancer and remove it at its root. Let’s, as one people, seek to unite beyond color lines under the banner of principle to bring about the change we need to see. Education is key, and knowledge is power. To my fellow ’90s and new millennium babies, we are the future.

I’d also like to thank Horace Butler for planting the seeds that have led me to reach this understanding.

After 40 Years in Solitary Confinement, Former Black Panther Could Be a Free Man

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When this story was first brought to my attention, all I could think of was how incredible it was that a man could spend four decades in isolation unbroken while maintaining his innocence. He endured arguably the worst punishment that can possibly be inflicted on an inmate by the prison system and will ultimately come out on top. Salute to you, Albert Woodfox. Your story is/will be an inspiration to many. Never let them break you.

Albert Woodfox, the last of three high-profile Louisiana prisoners known as the Angola Three, could walk free within days after a federal judge ordered state officials to release him immediately.

U.S. District Judge James Brady, the judge overseeing the closely watched human rights case, said Monday that the 68-year-old former Black Panther Party prison leader should be granted immediate freedom and not be tried again in the death of a prison guard stabbed to death during prison upheavals in 1972.

Brady, who presided over the case from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, ordered Woodfox’s unconditional release in a strongly worded ruling.

“The only just remedy is an unconditional writ of habeas corpus barring retrial of Mr. Albert Woodfox and releasing Mr. Woodfox from custody immediately,” Brady wrote.

SOURCE

[video] Baltimore Mom on Why She Hit Her Son During Riots: “I Don’t Want Him to be a Freddie Gray”

When the incident first aired, many speculated the mother was hitting him out of embarrassment or punishing him for being ‘stupid’. This is partially true. In an interview with CBS News, she says she was worried about his safety since he is her only son; she didn’t want him to a Freddie Gray. She goes on to say she does not support vandalization asserting that, “that’s not justice.” This is definitely a genuine concern for a mother, so her reaction is very understandable. However, I do commend the young man for having the heart to take a stand for what he felt was right, and hope he will continue to channel that energy into positive and productive outlets in his community as he grows.

[video] Baltimore Gang Members Dispel Rumors of Calling Truce to Harm Police

Baltimore Bloods & Pirus spoke with WBAL TV last night and clarified that local gangs did not call a truce to cause any harm to police, contrary to what the BPD has allowed to be promoted by the media. They acknowledge that although some of them are taking a non-violent stance, others within their respective gangs may not, which is a choice they do not condone, but are understanding of. The BPD and the media’s vilification of this truce and the parties involved is reminiscent of what constantly went on during the Black Panther era, and pretty much any other time Black People came together for a cause that threatened the status quo.

Enough Is Enough: The Death of Freddie Gray

Suspect Dies Baltimore

Photo Credit: AP/Alex Brandon

 

With scenes of the Michael Brown protests in Ferguson, MO still ripe in the minds of many, the clips that have been circulating of what took place in the Freddie Gray protests yesterday should not come as a surprise. In fact, they should be expected. Because when such displays of extreme disregard for human life are the catalyst for these actions, in communities where many of its downtrodden occupants already feel like they and others who look like them are walking targets, it is inevitable. Then, those whose duty it is to hold criminals accountable have the audacity to put the perpetrators of these contemptible acts on administrative leave with pay, while imposing mandatory curfews on those demanding justice and telling them how and where to protest. No, that’s not how it works. You do not get to dictate how the People choose to express themselves when your actions and/or failure to take necessary action is/are the reason(s) the People are protesting in the first place.

 

If we allow those whom we are protesting against to determine what is acceptable and what is not without applying any type of pressure, what is stopping these things from happening again if they feel they can contain the level of response? And if they know the People will ultimately acquiesce to their requests? Could this be a reason why we are seeing no change in the excessive use of police force across the country?

Besides police, I have heard quite a few people pass judgment on how protesters choose to express themselves. If you aren’t living in the same conditions as many of them or are so far removed from the urban community and the experiences of those living there that you can’t empathize with their struggle, then what right do you have to tell them how they should conduct their protests? How can one remain peaceful when your People have been getting harassed, assaulted, and killed by those whose job it is to protect and serve you and getting away with it for generations? How can you keep faith in the idea that justice will be served when time after time, it isn’t?

Do I condone one form of protest over another? No. I just am not naïve enough to believe that simply protesting peacefully is the only answer. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was as peaceful as they come, and he was still shot down in cold blood. Not everyone who uses aggressive action as a form of protest is a thug, hoodlum, animal, or opportunist; many of them are just tired of not being heard. If they were to take their aggression out on the police rather than their surroundings, then what would you say?

When things like social unrest start moving into areas like Downtown Baltimore, as shown in the video below, where the people of higher classes are known to frequent, clearly there is a communication barrier that exists that we all need to address, because the death of Freddie Gray is not just a Black issue, it is a human issue. To some, the Orioles game or the White House Correspondents Dinner held more value than showing solidarity with our brothers and sisters (Black, Brown, White, whatever) in demanding justice for this man’s life. And let’s be realistic, telling people to make sure they vote in the next ballot or election does absolutely nothing to help them right now. You can’t expect those being affected to just sit on their hands and remain passive until the polls open while injustice continues to plague their communities. Enough is enough. You are either part of the solution or part of the problem.

 

If you haven’t been keeping up with the protests in Baltimore, check this extensive article written by WBALTV. What are your thoughts on the protests and the current state of society in the U.S.?